10 Parenting Tips to Calm Down Any Child In a Minute

Tantrums are very common in kids aged 1 to 4. More than half of kids let their frustration out at least once a week, or more often. Why do they do it?

By the time they turn 3 or 4, kids have much better language skills than babies, of course, but their vocabulary is still not advanced enough to describe everything they feel. So what can you do to prevent your kids from going crazy now and then? TIMESTAMPS Make your child feel comfortable 1:21 Let your toddler choose 2:08 Find out what's really bothering your kid 2:58 Distract your little one 3:40 Become a good teacher for your kid 4:23 Do not provoke tantrums 5:20 Use positive words 5:56 Keep a straight face 6:30 Give praise when the kid deserves it 7:00 Be smart about the pocket money 7:38 SUMMARY - If you are going out for a longer time, take their favorite blanket with you. It will give them the feeling of home and safety. When you are a parent, you tend to take plenty of stuff with you even when you leave the house for an hour. If someone is making fun of you, let them. - Start with little things, which will make him or her feel like they are in control. Control also means responsibility. They will of course not know it just now, but they will see how their choices affect what they do and how they feel. - don’ta get the message; they don’t get the answer. What do they do? Throw a tantrum. Dr. Hoecker offers the following solution: try to create a sign language your kid will understand and remember. Teach them to show basic words like “food,” “milk,” “sleep” and so on. - Your child will unlikely be getting over a breakup or job loss, but they have their own concerns, as we know. When you feel danger is coming, the baby’s face is reddening, or they are giving other signs of a tantrum to follow, distract them. “Let’s go for a walk,” “How about we read your favorite book” are all great ways to divert your child’s fleeting attention. - Michele Borba, Ed.D., author of Parents Do Make a Difference, explains that kids really want to do what is right, but sometimes they just don’t know what that is. Explain your concerns and fears, never yell at or in front of your kid. You could even make up an “angry vocabulary” for your child. That would be a list of words to express negative emotions. - Your kid doesn’t like to be forcefully interrupted, or feels uncomfortable about doing certain things? Give them warning before they have to do it and explain why it is necessary. - Millions of people in 47 countries around the world love Supernanny. This modern-day Mary Poppins gives great parenting advice. One of the things she suggests is using positive instead of the negative. Every time you feel like screaming "no," "don’t" and "stop," don’t do it. “Don’t jump on the couch” could motivate your kid to do the opposite, especially if they are moody. - Introduce the new family rule to your kid. When he or she starts whining, you have the right not to respond to them. If that happens, keep your face straight. You made a deal, right? Jane Nelsen, Ed.D., coauthor of Positive Discipline for Preschoolers recommends that you also introduce a warning sign which will show you are going to stop listening. - We are not just talking about money here. Your baby will unlikely appreciate it, anyway. Thank the kids for doing something right. Doctor Michele Borba thinks it is a good idea to say things like "Thanks for using your normal voice" or "My ears love that voice." - All families are different and have different income. There is no universal answer for “how much pocket money to give your kid” in numbers. Rooster Money, a resourcefully focused on how you should go about pocket money for your child, offers an Allowance Report. It says four-year-olds get an average of $2.82. This amount is slowly growing and doubles by the time the kid turns 9. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz